Ate Chinhintku Kici Wakpazopi | Gerald & Jim Yellowhawk

Dahl Arts Center - Rapid City Arts Council, Rapid City, SD Category: Arts, Antiques, Crafts

Description

The Rapid City Arts Council is excited to announce our newest exhibition by father and son artists Gerald and Jim Yellowhawk. Ate Chinhintku Kici Wakpazopi opens on December 1, 2017 and will be on display until March 17, 2018. A reception will be held on Friday, December 1 from 5-7pm. At 6pm we will have our program including a dance performance by the artists.  The show will be located in the Ruth Brennan Gallery at the Dahl Arts Center in downtown Rapid City.

Father and son, Gerald and Jim Yellowhawk, are both South Dakota artists and both enrolled members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. They share their love of their Lakota culture as subject matter in all their art forms. This exhibit will be the first father and son showing that we have had in our galleries.

In addition to being a life-long self-taught artist, Gerald is a retired, ordained minister who is fluent in Lakota.  As a young boy, Gerald visualized his life to be that of an artist. Consequently, he has been drawing and painting since childhood. Gerald’s enthusiasm for the outdoors and the four legged and winged friends that share this world, has been a constant source of inspiration for his art. Another profound influence in Gerald’s life has been his grandfather and spiritual leader, Elk Head.

Jim Yellowhawk is a professional artist who works in many two and three dimensional mediums. He has studied the work of Oscar Howe, whose art has been a strong influence on his decision to pursue art as a professional career. Jim is always challenging himself to use different materials in order to accurately communicate what he’s trying to say. Jim has always done humorous pieces and humor has always existed in Lakota culture as a form of healing. Years ago when Jim’s wife passed on from cancer, he found the strength to continue with his artwork and realized that it was helping him heal from that loss.